The Classics Club Spin #16 – Short and Sweet

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The Classics Club announced the Spin number yesterday:

4

Which means I’ll be reading The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett.  While it wasn’t the book I really wanted, it will be a quick, easy read and that’s probably a good thing right now.  I’m in the middle of reading The Silmarillion by J.R.R. Tolkien and it is definitely not light reading.

  1. Kafka, Franz: The Trial
  2. Lawrence, D.H.: Lady Chatterley’s Lover
  3. Du Maurier, Daphne: Rebecca
  4. Burnett, Frances Hodgson: The Secret Garden
  5. Barrie, J.M.: Peter Pan
  6. Beckett, Samuel: Waiting for Godot
  7. Remarque: All Quiet on the Western Front
  8. Melville, Herman: Moby Dick
  9. Hemingway, Ernest: A Farewell to Arms
  10. Bronte, Anne: Agnes Grey
  11. Flaubert, Gustav: Madame Bovary
  12. Eliot, George: Middlemarch
  13. Proust, Marcel: Swann’s Way
  14. Gogol, Nikolay: Dead Souls
  15. Hawthorne, Nathaniel: The Scarlet Letter
  16. Heller, Joseph: Catch-22
  17. Cooper, James Fenimore: The Last of the Mohicans
  18. Crane, Stephen: Red Badge of Courage
  19. Hugo, Victor: The Hunchback of Notre Dame
  20. Dickens, Charles: Oliver Twist

Are you participating in the Classics Club Spin?

The Classics Club Spin #16

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It’s time for another Classics Club Spin!  Below is my Spin list.  While I’m interested in reading all of the books on this and my master list, I’m really hoping it will be one of the books below in particular.  I’m not saying which one, though.

  1. Kafka, Franz: The Trial
  2. Lawrence, D.H.: Lady Chatterley’s Lover
  3. Du Maurier, Daphne: Rebecca
  4. Burnett, Frances Hodgson: The Secret Garden
  5. Barrie, J.M.: Peter Pan
  6. Beckett, Samuel: Waiting for Godot
  7. Remarque: All Quiet on the Western Front
  8. Melville, Herman: Moby Dick
  9. Hemingway, Ernest: A Farewell to Arms
  10. Bronte, Anne: Agnes Grey
  11. Flaubert, Gustav: Madame Bovary
  12. Eliot, George: Middlemarch
  13. Proust, Marcel: Swann’s Way
  14. Gogol, Nikolay: Dead Souls
  15. Hawthorne, Nathaniel: The Scarlet Letter
  16. Heller, Joseph: Catch-22
  17. Cooper, James Fenimore: The Last of the Mohicans
  18. Crane, Stephen: Red Badge of Courage
  19. Hugo, Victor: The Hunchback of Notre Dame
  20. Dickens, Charles: Oliver Twist

The Spin number will be chosen on Friday, November 17th, and then those of us participating will have until the end of the year to read the book that corresponds to that number.

Are you participating in the Classics Club Spin?

The Classics Club Spin Number

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The Classics Club announced the Spin number today:

1

Which means I’ll be reading Who’s Afraid of Virginia Wolfe? by Edward Albee.  I’ll take a look at the book later today and figure out if I want to do a read along.  I might just decide to buckle down and finish it so I can get back to my #FrightFall TBR.  It’s a fairly short book, so we’ll see.

The Classics Club Spin #14

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It’s time for another Classics Club Spin!  Below is my Spin list, and since I failed miserably at the last Spin (I didn’t even start Lord of the Flies) , I will probably do a read-along.  While I’m interested in reading all of the books on this and my master list, I’m really hoping it will be one of the books below in particular.  I’m not saying which one though because I don’t want to jinx it.  Regardless of whether or not it ends up being my Spin book, I will be reading it before the end of the year, so you’ll know which one I’m referring to soon enough.

  1. Albee, Edward: Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
  2. Lawrence, D.H.: Lady Chatterley’s Lover
  3. Atwood, Margaret: A Handmaid’s Tale
  4. Du Maurier, Daphne: Rebecca
  5. Beckett, Samuel: Waiting for Godot
  6. Dumas, Alexandre: The Count of Monte Cristo
  7. Remarque: All Quiet on the Western Front
  8. Bronte, Anne: Agnes Grey
  9. Flaubert, Gustav: Madame Bovary
  10. Milton, John: Paradise Lost
  11. Hawthorne, Nathaniel: The House of the Seven Gables
  12. Proust, Marcel: Swann’s Way
  13. Goethe, Johann: Faust
  14. Eliot, George: Middlemarch
  15. Golding, William: Lord of the Flies
  16. Hawthorne, Nathaniel: The Scarlet Letter
  17. Hemingway, Ernest: A Farewell to Arms
  18. Cooper, James Fenimore: The Last of the Mohicans
  19. Crane, Stephen: Red Badge of Courage
  20. Irving, Washington: The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

The Spin number will be chosen on Monday, and then those of us participating will have until December 1st to read the book that corresponds to that number.

Are you participating in the Classics Club Spin?  Whether or not you’re participating, would you be interested in doing a read-along of any of the books on my list?  Let me know in the comments!

The Classics Club: The Fellowship of the Ring

Fellowship

  • Author: J.R.R. Tolkien
  • Pages: 407
  • Genre: Fantasy

 

 

I have the audiobook version of The Lord of the Rings, but since I haven’t read it since I was 12, I decided to borrow the Boyfriend’s copy instead of listening to the audio for #FanspeakTheRing.

Did you know that The Lord of the Rings is not actually a trilogy?  Though it’s usually broken down into three books (The Fellowship of the Ring, The Two Towers, and The Return of the King), it’s actually six books broken down into three parts/volumes.  Did you also know that, as a whole, they’re on the banned and challenged books list?  According to the ALA, it was burned in Alamogordo, New Mexico for being “satanic.”  My guess is that the people behind such a horrible act have never actually read The Lord of the Rings or know anything about its author.

Since I’m following the schedule for #FanspeakTheRing, I’ve only just started the second part.  So, I don’t yet have an opinion about it or the third part.  However, so far, it’s much better than I remember it being.  The Hobbit has always been my favorite book by Tolkien, and even though I love the movies based on The Lord of the Rings, I remember feeling as if the books dragged on a bit and were easily confusing when I read them all those years ago.  I never felt that way during this re-read, and if the rest is as wonderful, I’m fairly certain it will be joining the ranks of The Hobbit on my all-time favorites list.

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The Classics Club Spin: Brought to You by the Number…

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The Classics Club announced the Spin number today:

15

Which means I’ll be reading Lord of the Flies by William Golding.  I’ll take a look at the book later today and figure out if I want to do a read along.

  1. Albee, Edward: Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
  2. Anonymous: One Thousand and One Nights
  3. Atwood, Margaret: A Handmaid’s Tale
  4. Barrie, J.M.: Peter Pan
  5. Dumas, Alexandre: The Count of Monte Cristo
  6. Remarque: All Quiet on the Western Front
  7. Bronte, Anne: Agnes Grey
  8. Fitzgerald, F. Scott: Tender is the Night
  9. Milton, John: Paradise Lost
  10. Burnett, Frances Hodgson: The Secret Garden
  11. Proust, Marcel: Swann’s Way
  12. Burroughs, Edgar Rice: Tarzan of the Apes
  13. Goethe, Johann: Faust
  14. Yeats, William Butler: Irish Faerie Tales
  15. Golding, William: Lord of the Flies
  16. Wells, H.G.: The Time Machine
  17. Heller, Joseph: Catch-22
  18. Hemingway, Ernest: A Farewell to Arms
  19. Crane, Stephen: Red Badge of Courage
  20. Swift, Jonathon: Gulliver’s Travels

Classics Club Spin #13

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It’s that time again!  The Classics Club is doing another Spin.  I was not at all successful with the last Classics Club Spin, but I’m hoping this time around will go better.  Below is my Spin list.  On Monday, a number between 1 and 20 will be chosen, and I’ll be reading the book from my list that corresponds with that number.  I’ll have until August 1st to finish it.  Depending on which book it is, I might do a read-along.

  1. Albee, Edward: Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
  2. Anonymous: One Thousand and One Nights
  3. Atwood, Margaret: A Handmaid’s Tale
  4. Barrie, J.M.: Peter Pan
  5. Dumas, Alexandre: The Count of Monte Cristo
  6. Remarque: All Quiet on the Western Front
  7. Bronte, Anne: Agnes Grey
  8. Fitzgerald, F. Scott: Tender is the Night
  9. Milton, John: Paradise Lost
  10. Burnett, Frances Hodgson: The Secret Garden
  11. Proust, Marcel: Swann’s Way
  12. Burroughs, Edgar Rice: Tarzan of the Apes
  13. Goethe, Johann: Faust
  14. Yeats, William Butler: Irish Faerie Tales
  15. Golding, William: Lord of the Flies
  16. Wells, H.G.: The Time Machine
  17. Heller, Joseph: Catch-22
  18. Hemingway, Ernest: A Farewell to Arms
  19. Crane, Stephen: Red Badge of Courage
  20. Swift, Jonathon: Gulliver’s Travels

Classics Club Spin: The Winner Is…

classicsclub

The Classics Club announced the Spin number today:

8

Which means I’ll be reading A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith.  I’ll take a look at the book later today and figure out if I want to do a readalong.

  1.  Albee, Edward: Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
  2. Lawrence, D.H.: Lady Chatterley’s Lover
  3. Atwood, Margaret: A Handmaid’s Tale
  4. Du Maurier, Daphne: Rebecca
  5. Barrie, J.M.: Peter Pan
  6. Dumas, Alexandre: The Count of Monte Cristo
  7. Remarque: All Quiet on the Western Front
  8. Smith, Betty: A Tree Grows in Brooklyn
  9. Bronte, Anne: Agnes Grey
  10. Fitzgerald, F. Scott: Tender is the Night
  11. Flaubert, Gustav: Madame Bovary
  12. Milton, John: Paradise Lost
  13. Burnett, Frances Hodgson: The Secret Garden
  14. Proust, Marcel: Swann’s Way
  15. Goethe, Johann: Faust
  16. Carroll, Lewis: Alice in Wonderland
  17. Yeats, William Butler: Irish Faerie Tales
  18. Hemingway, Ernest: A Farewell to Arms
  19. de Saint-Exupery, Antoine: The Little Prince
  20. Swift, Jonathon: Gulliver’s Travels

Classics Club Spin #12

classicsclub

It’s that time again!  The Classics Club is doing another Spin.  Below is my Spin list.  On Monday, a number between 1 and 20 will be chosen, and I’ll be reading the book from my list that corresponds with that number.  I’ll have until May 2nd to finish it.  Depending on which book it is, I might do a read-along.

  1.  Albee, Edward: Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
  2. Lawrence, D.H.: Lady Chatterley’s Lover
  3. Atwood, Margaret: A Handmaid’s Tale
  4. Du Maurier, Daphne: Rebecca
  5. Barrie, J.M.: Peter Pan
  6. Dumas, Alexandre: The Count of Monte Cristo
  7. Remarque: All Quiet on the Western Front
  8. Smith, Betty: A Tree Grows in Brooklyn
  9. Bronte, Anne: Agnes Grey
  10. Fitzgerald, F. Scott: Tender is the Night
  11. Flaubert, Gustav: Madame Bovary
  12. Milton, John: Paradise Lost
  13. Burnett, Frances Hodgson: The Secret Garden
  14. Proust, Marcel: Swann’s Way
  15. Goethe, Johann: Faust
  16. Carroll, Lewis: Alice in Wonderland
  17. Yeats, William Butler: Irish Faerie Tales
  18. Hemingway, Ernest: A Farewell to Arms
  19. de Saint-Exupery, Antoine: The Little Prince
  20. Swift, Jonathon: Gulliver’s Travels

Classics Club: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

Oz

  • Author: L. Frank Baum

I received the audiobook for free from audiobooks.com.

I enjoyed the story much more than I thought I would.  While I love the film adaptation, I had some initial reservations about the book considering I learned that L. Frank Baum wrote it as a political and economic statement in support of the Populist party who supported a bimetallic standard of gold (the yellow brick road) and silver (Dorothy’s silver shoes.  That’s right, they’re silver in the book, not ruby), instead of the Gold Standard.  However, I realized while listening to the book that, if there is some kind of statement at all, it’s not in any way obvious.

Maybe I missed something, though.  That’s possible for two reasons.  First, Brooke Shields narrated the book as if she were reading it to a very young child, and the majority of her male character voices were downright annoying.  Second, Dorothy has no agency.  She doesn’t do anything deliberately unless you count her following the instructions to walk down the yellow brick road to get to the Emerald City.  Everything else just sort of happens to her, or is an accident.  How did I miss that in the movie?!

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz was written in 1900, and it was meant to be a children’s book.  These reasons are the only ones for why I forgive Dorothy’s lack of legitimate action.  She is technically the main character, however, so there’s that.  Putting Brooke Shields’ narration aside, I would recommend the book to anyone who wants a quick Classic to read or wants a Classic children’s chapter book to give to a kid who might enjoy it.

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